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Showing posts from December, 2010

Bye bye 2010

People take drinking to a higher level in December, hence I was a bit busy the last weeks. Now I'm relaxing, with Bach's Weihnachtskantaten and a lovely Bourgogne Roncevie 2008 from Domaine Arlaud. And the blog gets a little less attention...

I want to thank Doris Vroom from Winefields for the exciting tasting she organised this month, a welcome intermezzo. The Latour 1983 was impressive, in the first place. Fiery, as someone described it. I won't dive into my tasting notes here, but it was great to discover.

The most interesting aspect of this tasting for me was that weaker vintages should not be neglected. We were all surprised by a smokey and lean La Lagune 1991, a seductive La Fleur Pétrus 1992, and a pleasant Lynch Bages 1993.

Jadot's Musigny 1994 that I drank a few days later was good but it didn't have the (expected?) wow-factor. The wine that did have that factor was the Champagne Georges Laval Brut Nature (organic since 1971) which for me renders the essence …

Is Pomerol Pomerol?

Dwayne Perreault — To say x is x is being obvious, yet there is a deeper meaning. X is x is an affirmation of itself, that only x can be x. And so we get France is France, life is life, war is war, that is that. If I say George Bush is George Bush, you know what I mean.

But now try saying, wine is wine. Doesn’t work for me. And I’m not sure I’d say Pomerol is Pomerol either, since I’ve tasted a number of Pomerols now, and each time I seem to taste a different wine. I’ve had heavy, pensive, iron-rich Pomerol, autumnal Pomerol with wet forest and truffel smells, and Pomerol that was so purely neat in extraction that I thought it had something in common with elegant Burgundy.


It’s such a tiny area, so how is this possible? Is it because of the capricious Merlot grape, which offers so many different kinds of wines around the world? Is it because of the many small and different winemakers? Or is Pomerol so complex that it takes years of serious tasting to understand it?

Whatever the reason(s…

"Bordeaux 2010 probably even better than 2009"

This is not some French sales tiger who's talking, nor a random wine journalist who is trying to attract attention. No, it is the highly respected Kees van Leeuwen, professor in Bordeaux at ENITA (Ecole Nationale des Ingénieurs de Travaux Agricoles) and ISVV (Institut des Sciences de la Vigne et du Vin). Also, Van Leeuwen is the technical director at Château Cheval Blanc. In an article on Bordeaux 2010 in the Dutch magazine Perswijn he states: "2010 is without doubt a grand vintage in Bordeaux, probably even better than 2009."

the Chinese number ten

The story behind the high quality reminds me of 2009. All levels are high again: anthocyanins, tannins and sugars are all at record levels, even surpassing 2009. Combined with a good acidity (and ripeness) we are again looking at a year which is displaying harmony on the highest level—it's like arm wrestling musclemen keeping each other locked in strenuous balance.

Exciting of course... but what does that mean for the prices…